Rafael Coronel Museum

Zacatecas

Home of the Mexican tradition
 
Located in the old former Convent of San Francisco de Zacatecas (17th century), the Rafael Coronel Museum protects, in addition to other incomparable collections of pre-Columbian pieces and of Mexican popular art, a large collection of more than ten thousand Mexican masks, along with a series of drawings and sketches by Diego Rivera, Mexican puppets of the Rosete Aranda, ethnic musical instruments, viceregal terracottas, as well as documents of great value for the history of Zacatecas, such as the royal identity cards of the city, title and coat of arms, conferred by King Felipe II of Spain in the years 1585 and 1588.
 
The collection of masks is considered the largest in the world and is an opportunity to learn about almost all the ceremonial masks that are used in Mexican festivals and popular dances.
 
The fact that Zacatecas has this privilege is due to the Zacatecan painter Rafael Coronel, who donated it to his hometown in 1990, along with some other of the aforementioned collections. Some works by the master Colonel are also exhibited in the Museum's Author's Room, which were made expressly for the place, among which the tastuán and the girl from Jerez and the Mortaja stand out.
Home of the Mexican tradition

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Located in the old former Convent of San Francisco de Zacatecas (17th century), the Rafael Coronel Museum protects, in addition to other incomparable collections of pre-Columbian pieces and of Mexican popular art, a large collection of more than ten thousand Mexican masks, along with a series of drawings and sketches by Diego Rivera, Mexican puppets of the Rosete Aranda, ethnic musical instruments, viceregal terracottas, as well as documents of great value for the history of Zacatecas, such as the royal identity cards of the city, title and coat of arms, conferred by King Felipe II of Spain in the years 1585 and 1588.
 
The collection of masks is considered the largest in the world and is an opportunity to learn about almost all the ceremonial masks that are used in Mexican festivals and popular dances.
 
The fact that Zacatecas has this privilege is due to the Zacatecan painter Rafael Coronel, who donated it to his hometown in 1990, along with some other of the aforementioned collections. Some works by the master Colonel are also exhibited in the Museum's Author's Room, which were made expressly for the place, among which the tastuán and the girl from Jerez and the Mortaja stand out.

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