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Kabáh

Yucatán

The Mayan archaeological remains of Kabáh are of a singular beauty that places them as one of the most outstanding examples of Puuc architecture in the Yucatan peninsula.

Puuc architecture is one of the five architectural styles developed by Mayans in this area—characterized by having low hills, fertile land and lacking rivers—. Here you can follow the so-called Puuc Route that includes other prehispanic cities such as Uxmal, Nohpat, Sayil, Xlapak and Labná.

Due to its exceptional value, the Puuc Route was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, under Villa Precolombina de Uxmal name.

Kabáh archaeological site is one of few that keeps its original name, as it is mentioned in the Chilam Balam de Chumayel book. The word Kabáh has been translated from ancient Maya as “Lord of the mighty hand or the heavy hand”.

The name would be associated with a sculpture found by archaeologists that represents a man holding a serpent with his hand.

Although only a part of Kabáh buildings have been rebuilt, the structure's complexity is such that it's comparable to Uxmal, with which it is closely related.

One of the archaeological site's simplest structures, a monumental arch with a Mayan vault, marks the beginning of the 18 kilometers long and five meters wide sacbé or Mayan trail that linked Kabáh with Uxmal. Furthermore, a legend asserted that the dwarf who ruled Uxmal was from Kabáh.

Although found vestiges indicate that the area was inhabited since 400 BC, Kabáh’s splendor is dated between 600 and 1000 AD.

The archaeological site, 113 kilometers southern Mérida, passing through the town of Santa Ana, is open to the public and the visit is as interesting as surprising.

Kabáh’s most prominent building is Codz Poop or Palacio de los Mascarones, adorned with more than 250 representations of Chaak, the god of rain. Nearby is El Palacio, the largest building in Kabáh, that likely had administrative functions. It’s suspected it was inhabited by many people—several chultuns, water collection facilities, surrounded it since there were no rivers here.

Other interesting buildings of the archaeological complex, besides the Arch, are the Manos Rojas (Red Hands), the Gran Pirámide (Great Pyramid), the hieroglyphs of the Cuadrángulo (Quadrangle) and the Columns, from which stones were extracted to build the nearby Hacienda de Santa Ana.
The Mayan archaeological remains of Kabáh are of a singular beauty that places them as one of the most outstanding examples of Puuc architecture in the Yucatan peninsula.

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Puuc architecture is one of the five architectural styles developed by Mayans in this area—characterized by having low hills, fertile land and lacking rivers—. Here you can follow the so-called Puuc Route that includes other prehispanic cities such as Uxmal, Nohpat, Sayil, Xlapak and Labná.

Due to its exceptional value, the Puuc Route was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, under Villa Precolombina de Uxmal name.

Kabáh archaeological site is one of few that keeps its original name, as it is mentioned in the Chilam Balam de Chumayel book. The word Kabáh has been translated from ancient Maya as “Lord of the mighty hand or the heavy hand”.

The name would be associated with a sculpture found by archaeologists that represents a man holding a serpent with his hand.

Although only a part of Kabáh buildings have been rebuilt, the structure's complexity is such that it's comparable to Uxmal, with which it is closely related.

One of the archaeological site's simplest structures, a monumental arch with a Mayan vault, marks the beginning of the 18 kilometers long and five meters wide sacbé or Mayan trail that linked Kabáh with Uxmal. Furthermore, a legend asserted that the dwarf who ruled Uxmal was from Kabáh.

Although found vestiges indicate that the area was inhabited since 400 BC, Kabáh’s splendor is dated between 600 and 1000 AD.

The archaeological site, 113 kilometers southern Mérida, passing through the town of Santa Ana, is open to the public and the visit is as interesting as surprising.

Kabáh’s most prominent building is Codz Poop or Palacio de los Mascarones, adorned with more than 250 representations of Chaak, the god of rain. Nearby is El Palacio, the largest building in Kabáh, that likely had administrative functions. It’s suspected it was inhabited by many people—several chultuns, water collection facilities, surrounded it since there were no rivers here.

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