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Huamantla

Tlaxcala

There are those who claim that what comes in small quantities is always better, and perhaps that is the case of Tlaxcala which, despite its size, is like a chest that preserves beautiful landscapes, traditions, flavors and stories that tell part of the origins of Mexico.

Among the many treasures that Tlaxcala keeps we can discover Huamantla, an ideal place to spend a quiet weekend in nature or, well, discovering century-old traditions that survive in their haciendas.

The best way to get to Huamantla is by road, as it is 40 minutes from the city of Tlaxcala, one hour from the capital of Puebla and two and a half hours from Mexico City.

The climate in Huamantla, Tlaxcala, ranges from mild to cold due to its location, right in a valley at more than 2,400 meters (7874 feet) above sea level. This Magical Town is surrounded by forest so summers are usually wet and winters are cold.

One of the traditions that distinguish Huamantla is its majestic sawdust carpets, which fill the streets of the town with color during la Noche Que Nadie Duerme (the Night That No One Sleeps), a celebration that takes place the night of August 14-15 in honor of la Vírgen de la Caridad (the Virgin of Charity), whose figure came to this city in the 18th century.

The inhabitants of the village design and install their beautiful sawdust mats -which can measure up to 6 kilometers (about 4 miles)- in the streets surrounding the Church of Nuestra Señora de la Caridad, since the Virgin leaves in procession at one o'clock in the morning and, in this way, they are grateful for her favors and blessings.

Another tradition that has its origin in the festivities of the Virgen de la Caridad is the Huamantlada. Inspired by the Sanfermines in Pamplona, Spain, it consists of letting a group of fighting bulls run through a circuit adapted to the streets of the city. The inhabitants decorate the facades of their houses to continue with the celebration, they set up stands and mockers and, the most daring, even jump on the road to try to bullfight.

The stories contained in their haciendas and the tradition of pulque are two more attractions of Huamantla that you have to include in your travel itinerary.
There are those who claim that what comes in small quantities is always better, and perhaps that is the case of Tlaxcala which, despite its size, is like a chest that preserves beautiful landscapes, traditions, flavors and stories that tell part of the origins of Mexico.

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Among the many treasures that Tlaxcala keeps we can discover Huamantla, an ideal place to spend a quiet weekend in nature or, well, discovering century-old traditions that survive in their haciendas.

The best way to get to Huamantla is by road, as it is 40 minutes from the city of Tlaxcala, one hour from the capital of Puebla and two and a half hours from Mexico City.

The climate in Huamantla, Tlaxcala, ranges from mild to cold due to its location, right in a valley at more than 2,400 meters (7874 feet) above sea level. This Magical Town is surrounded by forest so summers are usually wet and winters are cold.

One of the traditions that distinguish Huamantla is its majestic sawdust carpets, which fill the streets of the town with color during la Noche Que Nadie Duerme (the Night That No One Sleeps), a celebration that takes place the night of August 14-15 in honor of la Vírgen de la Caridad (the Virgin of Charity), whose figure came to this city in the 18th century.

The inhabitants of the village design and install their beautiful sawdust mats -which can measure up to 6 kilometers (about 4 miles)- in the streets surrounding the Church of Nuestra Señora de la Caridad, since the Virgin leaves in procession at one o'clock in the morning and, in this way, they are grateful for her favors and blessings.

Another tradition that has its origin in the festivities of the Virgen de la Caridad is the Huamantlada. Inspired by the Sanfermines in Pamplona, Spain, it consists of letting a group of fighting bulls run through a circuit adapted to the streets of the city. The inhabitants decorate the facades of their houses to continue with the celebration, they set up stands and mockers and, the most daring, even jump on the road to try to bullfight.

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