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Carlos Pellicer Cámara Regional Museum of Anthropology

Villahermosa

It’s considered the second most important museum of its kind in Mexico, since it houses a vast archaeological legacy (10,000 pieces) of several Mesoamerican cultures: Olmec, Mayan, Mexica, Zapotec, Mixtec, Totonac, Teotihuacan and Toltec.

The Carlos Pellicer Cámara Regional Museum of Anthropology is divided into three sections and a mezzanine. The first room is dedicated to the prehistory and how America began to be populated more than 30 thousand years ago. Many pieces are vessels and figurines of religious worship. The second section talks about Olmec's importance in Tabasco lands.

The Olmec rulers and priests legitimized their power through communication with their gods. To do so they used stone sculptures associated with public architecture as a means to transmit this message in a persistent way and remain in men’s memory after his death. Among this culture most representative works are a geometric face made in green stone blocks known as a serpentine that was part of a massive offering located in La Venta: the Cabeza Colosal 2 from that same site; as well as basalt axes from the Ojoshal town.

Finally, the room Los Mayas de Tabasco: Dueños de Ríos y Selvas (Mayans of Tabasco: Owners of rivers and forests) explains how this culture took over the Tabasco jungle and the intricate communications network formed by the rivers. In addition to how they managed to build large towns, cities and manors that fought for their autonomy and independence from the urban centers of Alto Usumacinta and Petén.

Reflection of this power are some of the 7th-and-8th-centuries-AD pieces that can be admired in the room, such as Estelas 1 and 2 of Moral-Reforma, the monuments with inscriptions of El Tortuguero (highlighting number 6), stucco and limestone censer-holders brought by the poet Carlos Pellicer himself, as well as a set of Zoque culture effigy censers from different caves in the Sierra de Tabasco (600-900 AD).

The Carlos Pellicer Cámara Regional Museum of Anthropology is at Avenida Carlos Pellicer Cámara 511, downtown Villahermosa. Hours: Tuesday to Sunday, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
It’s considered the second most important museum of its kind in Mexico, since it houses a vast archaeological legacy (10,000 pieces) of several Mesoamerican cultures: Olmec, Mayan, Mexica, Zapotec, Mixtec, Totonac, Teotihuacan and Toltec.

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The Carlos Pellicer Cámara Regional Museum of Anthropology is divided into three sections and a mezzanine. The first room is dedicated to the prehistory and how America began to be populated more than 30 thousand years ago. Many pieces are vessels and figurines of religious worship. The second section talks about Olmec's importance in Tabasco lands.

The Olmec rulers and priests legitimized their power through communication with their gods. To do so they used stone sculptures associated with public architecture as a means to transmit this message in a persistent way and remain in men’s memory after his death. Among this culture most representative works are a geometric face made in green stone blocks known as a serpentine that was part of a massive offering located in La Venta: the Cabeza Colosal 2 from that same site; as well as basalt axes from the Ojoshal town.

Finally, the room Los Mayas de Tabasco: Dueños de Ríos y Selvas (Mayans of Tabasco: Owners of rivers and forests) explains how this culture took over the Tabasco jungle and the intricate communications network formed by the rivers. In addition to how they managed to build large towns, cities and manors that fought for their autonomy and independence from the urban centers of Alto Usumacinta and Petén.

Reflection of this power are some of the 7th-and-8th-centuries-AD pieces that can be admired in the room, such as Estelas 1 and 2 of Moral-Reforma, the monuments with inscriptions of El Tortuguero (highlighting number 6), stucco and limestone censer-holders brought by the poet Carlos Pellicer himself, as well as a set of Zoque culture effigy censers from different caves in the Sierra de Tabasco (600-900 AD).

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