Back

El Castillo (The Castle), in Tulum

Tulum

Located on the seashore, this structure is one of the main buildings of the Tulum archaeological site.

El Castillo (The Castle) was built by the ancient Mayas on a cliff, 12 meters (40 feet) above sea level, which makes it a strategic surveillance point for preventing possible attacks by enemies, as well as to guide Maya seafarers at risk of crashing into the coral reef located near Tulum's coast, which is part of the Mesoamerican reef system. This system is considered to be the second largest reef system in the world, after Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

Climbing the structure is not allowed, but you can climb the stone staircase on the side, in order to explore it and to take in the decorations on the three entryways located at the top, which are supported by three snake-shaped columns.

The archaeological site in Tulum boasts other important buildings, such as the Templo del Dios del Viento (Temple of the God of the Wind), which has a small altar inside. There is a special hole on top of it: it is said that, when a hurricane was coming, the aperture would emit a whistling sound that warned the Mayas when they needed to leave the city and seek protection in the forest. It is also thought to be an astronomical observatory.

Be sure to explore the Templo de los Frescos (Temple of the Frescoes) before departing. There is a back room on the first floor that contains the vestiges of a mural representing female and male deities, intertwined snakes, and offerings of flowers, fruit, and corn.

There are large plaster masks in the corners of the frieze that possibly represent the God Itzmaná, the Mayan creator God.

The archaeological site is open Monday through Sunday, from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

Located on the seashore, this structure is one of the main buildings of the Tulum archaeological site.

Show more information


El Castillo (The Castle) was built by the ancient Mayas on a cliff, 12 meters (40 feet) above sea level, which makes it a strategic surveillance point for preventing possible attacks by enemies, as well as to guide Maya seafarers at risk of crashing into the coral reef located near Tulum's coast, which is part of the Mesoamerican reef system. This system is considered to be the second largest reef system in the world, after Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

Climbing the structure is not allowed, but you can climb the stone staircase on the side, in order to explore it and to take in the decorations on the three entryways located at the top, which are supported by three snake-shaped columns.

The archaeological site in Tulum boasts other important buildings, such as the Templo del Dios del Viento (Temple of the God of the Wind), which has a small altar inside. There is a special hole on top of it: it is said that, when a hurricane was coming, the aperture would emit a whistling sound that warned the Mayas when they needed to leave the city and seek protection in the forest. It is also thought to be an astronomical observatory.

Be sure to explore the Templo de los Frescos (Temple of the Frescoes) before departing. There is a back room on the first floor that contains the vestiges of a mural representing female and male deities, intertwined snakes, and offerings of flowers, fruit, and corn.

There are large plaster masks in the corners of the frieze that possibly represent the God Itzmaná, the Mayan creator God.

The archaeological site is open Monday through Sunday, from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

Show less

Other activities and things to do
Book now!
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Write a key word