Back

Barranca de los Jilgueros (Carduelis cliff)

Zacatlán

Zacatlán de las Manzanas has always bragged about grandeur of its Barranca de los Jilgueros (Carduelis cliff), which is part of Puebla's Sierra Norte mountain range. The pre-Hispanic populations who once lived at the foot of the canyon left evidence of their dwellings in the shape of monoliths and petroglyphs that can be accessed through a hiking tour.

One of its most popular marvels is the Tres Marías waterfall, fed by the waters of a tract of the Ajajalpan River known as San Pedro. It boasts a three-tiered water curtain, each of which is named after a saint: María Dolorosa, María Guadalupe, and María Magdalena. Locals have long defended these names against a proposal to rename it cola de caballo (horse tail). It stands 984 feet tall and can be seen from the overlook above the ravine.

The Barranca de los Jilgueros harbors a secret: a 1,400-meter-long (one mile) zipline that allows you to soar over it, much like its resident avian population does. You can purchase tickets for this adventure in the town square. Tickets include a ride on an antique bus that will take you to the zipline. After ziplining, you can hike the old trail to San Miguel Tenango, which was a path frequently traversed by the Náhuatl peoples.

Cabins with terraces are available for rent on the ravine and feature fog-covered sunrises accompanied with a cup of hot coffee.

Zacatlán de las Manzanas has always bragged about grandeur of its Barranca de los Jilgueros (Carduelis cliff), which is part of Puebla's Sierra Norte mountain range. The pre-Hispanic populations who once lived at the foot of the canyon left evidence of their dwellings in the shape of monoliths and petroglyphs that can be accessed through a hiking tour.

Show more information


One of its most popular marvels is the Tres Marías waterfall, fed by the waters of a tract of the Ajajalpan River known as San Pedro. It boasts a three-tiered water curtain, each of which is named after a saint: María Dolorosa, María Guadalupe, and María Magdalena. Locals have long defended these names against a proposal to rename it cola de caballo (horse tail). It stands 984 feet tall and can be seen from the overlook above the ravine.

The Barranca de los Jilgueros harbors a secret: a 1,400-meter-long (one mile) zipline that allows you to soar over it, much like its resident avian population does. You can purchase tickets for this adventure in the town square. Tickets include a ride on an antique bus that will take you to the zipline. After ziplining, you can hike the old trail to San Miguel Tenango, which was a path frequently traversed by the Náhuatl peoples.

Cabins with terraces are available for rent on the ravine and feature fog-covered sunrises accompanied with a cup of hot coffee.

Show less

Other activities and things to do
Book now!
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Write a key word