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Cuetzalan del Progreso

Puebla

Mexico boasts thousands of gorgeous places waiting to be discovered. The Pueblo Mágico (Magical Town) of Cuetzalan is one of them. Located in the rocky mountains of Puebla, three hours away from the state capital, the county is surrounded by beautiful coffee plantations, caves, grottoes, and movie-worthy forest landscapes covered in fog.

It is the birthplace of one of the country’s most iconic birds, the quetzal, which is where Cuetzalan gets its name. It is worth mentioning that this town was founded by the Totonacas in 200 B.C.E. It was renamed San Francisco Cuetzalan under colonial rule, owing to the cultural synergy propitiated by the conquest.

A trip to this mountainous region will allow you to discover the culture and traditions of the Náhuatl and Totonaca people through a variety of ancestral rituals that are still practiced in the area, such as the Voladores (Flyers) or the Danza de los Quetzales (Quetzal Dance), which UNESCO designated an Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2009.

Stroll down its cobblestone streets, which resemble a storybook scene, and enjoy its tranquil ambience. A traditional marketplace sets up in the middle of the town square on the weekends. Often, this marketplace features pre-Hispanic traditions, such as trading and bartering local products in an effort to avoid money. It is, without a doubt, a fantastic opportunity to develop your negotiation skills.

Once you’re done exploring what the market has to offer, we recommend that you visit the Casa de la Cultura de Cuetzalan (Cuetzalan’s Cultural Center), an antique manor currently housing the Calmahuistic Ethnographic Museum, where you can learn about this Pueblo Mágico’s pre-Hispanic history.

The Temple of San Francis of Assisi is a must-see. Over 60-meters (197 feet) tall, its formidable tower is one of the tallest in Puebla. This religious structure is known to the locals as the Iglesia de los Jarritos (The Church of the Small Jars), since its decor features a row of clay jars.

Cuetzalan is one of the most important coffee-producing regions in the country. If you’re interested in learning more about the region’s coffee production and plantations, don’t hesitate to book a tour of the Reserva Azul plantation, which is located only three kilometers (1.8 mi) from this Pueblo Mágico. In addition to learning about the coffee-production process, enjoy the panoramic and post card-worthy views of the country’s Sierra Norte mountain range from its trails.
Mexico boasts thousands of gorgeous places waiting to be discovered. The Pueblo Mágico (Magical Town) of Cuetzalan is one of them. Located in the rocky mountains of Puebla, three hours away from the state capital, the county is surrounded by beautiful coffee plantations, caves, grottoes, and movie-worthy forest landscapes covered in fog.

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It is the birthplace of one of the country’s most iconic birds, the quetzal, which is where Cuetzalan gets its name. It is worth mentioning that this town was founded by the Totonacas in 200 B.C.E. It was renamed San Francisco Cuetzalan under colonial rule, owing to the cultural synergy propitiated by the conquest.

A trip to this mountainous region will allow you to discover the culture and traditions of the Náhuatl and Totonaca people through a variety of ancestral rituals that are still practiced in the area, such as the Voladores (Flyers) or the Danza de los Quetzales (Quetzal Dance), which UNESCO designated an Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2009.

Stroll down its cobblestone streets, which resemble a storybook scene, and enjoy its tranquil ambience. A traditional marketplace sets up in the middle of the town square on the weekends. Often, this marketplace features pre-Hispanic traditions, such as trading and bartering local products in an effort to avoid money. It is, without a doubt, a fantastic opportunity to develop your negotiation skills.

Once you’re done exploring what the market has to offer, we recommend that you visit the Casa de la Cultura de Cuetzalan (Cuetzalan’s Cultural Center), an antique manor currently housing the Calmahuistic Ethnographic Museum, where you can learn about this Pueblo Mágico’s pre-Hispanic history.

The Temple of San Francis of Assisi is a must-see. Over 60-meters (197 feet) tall, its formidable tower is one of the tallest in Puebla. This religious structure is known to the locals as the Iglesia de los Jarritos (The Church of the Small Jars), since its decor features a row of clay jars.

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