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Oaxaca's Textile Museum

Oaxaca

Oaxaca's Textile Museum is an ode to one of the most valued handicrafts in both Oaxaca and world: textiles.

The textile collection is safeguarded at Casa Antoneto, an 18th-century manor built atop the Convent of Santo Domingo's former orchard by Ángel de Antonelo y Bermúdez, a Spanish merchant who exported cochineal, the most popular natural ink in Oaxaca. The property stands out on account of its green quarry facade and its large, hand-carved wood gate.

Inside the manor, there are nine private collections of unique, donated textiles, such as the tlámachténtli (a vice-regal indigenous fabric), girdles, rebozos (shawls) from Santa María del Río, and fragments of a huipil embroidered with feathers. You can learn about the various techniques, designs, textures, and creative processes used to make them.

On Wednesdays, the museum offers guided tours of the temporary exhibits, as well as a restoration workshop, which is supervised by the Manuel Castillo Negrete National School of Conservation, Restoration and Museography. Weaving workshops are also available.

Entry into Oaxaca's Textile Museum is free. However, the Expo-Venta project was created in an effort to support textile artisans. You can purchase pieces directly from the artist in order to promote the #YoNoRegateo (“I do not bargain”) campaign that seeks to raise consciousness regarding fair prices for the artisans' beautiful work.

The museum is located at Hidalgo 917, in Oaxaca's historical center.
Oaxaca's Textile Museum is an ode to one of the most valued handicrafts in both Oaxaca and world: textiles.

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The textile collection is safeguarded at Casa Antoneto, an 18th-century manor built atop the Convent of Santo Domingo's former orchard by Ángel de Antonelo y Bermúdez, a Spanish merchant who exported cochineal, the most popular natural ink in Oaxaca. The property stands out on account of its green quarry facade and its large, hand-carved wood gate.

Inside the manor, there are nine private collections of unique, donated textiles, such as the tlámachténtli (a vice-regal indigenous fabric), girdles, rebozos (shawls) from Santa María del Río, and fragments of a huipil embroidered with feathers. You can learn about the various techniques, designs, textures, and creative processes used to make them.

On Wednesdays, the museum offers guided tours of the temporary exhibits, as well as a restoration workshop, which is supervised by the Manuel Castillo Negrete National School of Conservation, Restoration and Museography. Weaving workshops are also available.

Entry into Oaxaca's Textile Museum is free. However, the Expo-Venta project was created in an effort to support textile artisans. You can purchase pieces directly from the artist in order to promote the #YoNoRegateo (“I do not bargain”) campaign that seeks to raise consciousness regarding fair prices for the artisans' beautiful work.

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