Back

Tzintzuntzan cementery

Tzintzuntzan

Undoubtedly, this celebration attracts thousands of visitors every year to Michoacán lands, who are marveled by the night lighting over Pátzcuaro lake and moved by the dance of the fishermen, stay up late to witness the “Fiesta de las Ánimas”, that is how “Día de Muertos” is known in the Purépecha region.

Tzintzuntzan, along with the towns and islands that surround Pátzcuaro lake, are part of one of the most significant events of Mexican identity that have acquired the title of Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

At night, the Tzintzuntzan cemetery is impregnated with an aromatic trail that invades with the fragrance of the cempasúchil (marigold), the candles are kept lit to show the way home and meet those who are no longer here, embracing each other with the strength of faith, telling through the songs in Tarasco how much they have been missed.

The tombs are decorated with flowers and filled with food, typical sweets and photographs, no tomb remains empty, as a demonstration that the dead of Tzintzuntzan will never lack someone that yearns for them. In the cemetery there is no crying, the pain is transformed into hope and pleasant memories, into promises to see each other when the day comes.

Among the guitars and violins, you can hear the voices of the children singing to their grandparents, to their “tatas”. The Fiesta de las ánimas (The Party of the Animas) as the Purepechas say, is a reason for celebration and gratitude.

Undoubtedly, this celebration attracts thousands of visitors every year to Michoacán lands, who are marveled by the night lighting over Pátzcuaro lake and moved by the dance of the fishermen, stay up late to witness the “Fiesta de las Ánimas”, that is how “Día de Muertos” is known in the Purépecha region.

Show more information


Tzintzuntzan, along with the towns and islands that surround Pátzcuaro lake, are part of one of the most significant events of Mexican identity that have acquired the title of Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

At night, the Tzintzuntzan cemetery is impregnated with an aromatic trail that invades with the fragrance of the cempasúchil (marigold), the candles are kept lit to show the way home and meet those who are no longer here, embracing each other with the strength of faith, telling through the songs in Tarasco how much they have been missed.

The tombs are decorated with flowers and filled with food, typical sweets and photographs, no tomb remains empty, as a demonstration that the dead of Tzintzuntzan will never lack someone that yearns for them. In the cemetery there is no crying, the pain is transformed into hope and pleasant memories, into promises to see each other when the day comes.

Among the guitars and violins, you can hear the voices of the children singing to their grandparents, to their “tatas”. The Fiesta de las ánimas (The Party of the Animas) as the Purepechas say, is a reason for celebration and gratitude.

Show less

Other activities and things to do
Book now!
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Write a key word