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San Cristobal Parish

Mazamitla

The San Cristobal Parish is the most emblematic architectural monument in downtown Mazamitla. Its architecture stands out due to its eclectic style; that is, it does not adhere to a particular style. Eclectic architectural designs were built during the Belle Époque, a French expression used to designate the historical period between 1871 and the outbreak of the World War I in 1914 in Europe.

Due to its cone-shaped towers with all-white ailerons, except for the cornices, it is widely believed that the San Cristobal Parish boasts Chinese influence. It was built at the behest of José Santana García, a priest who lived in the temple for more than 30 years. A street in the downtown area and a lot of communal land bear his name, as he was also an important figure in the social renewal of Mazamitla: he introduced drinking water, built roads with picks and shovels, and acquired turbines so that the town could have electricity.

The interior of the parish is simple, with three naves and stained glass windows that decorate its ceiling. However, its pyramidal-shaped base stands out and, from it, you can see craftsmen working on chairs woven from ixtle, making black clay utensils, and embroidering jorongos. There is a small fountain at the front of the temple dedicated to the tapatío architect, José Luis Barragán, who was one of Mazamitla’s frequent visitors.
The San Cristobal Parish is the most emblematic architectural monument in downtown Mazamitla. Its architecture stands out due to its eclectic style; that is, it does not adhere to a particular style. Eclectic architectural designs were built during the Belle Époque, a French expression used to designate the historical period between 1871 and the outbreak of the World War I in 1914 in Europe.

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Due to its cone-shaped towers with all-white ailerons, except for the cornices, it is widely believed that the San Cristobal Parish boasts Chinese influence. It was built at the behest of José Santana García, a priest who lived in the temple for more than 30 years. A street in the downtown area and a lot of communal land bear his name, as he was also an important figure in the social renewal of Mazamitla: he introduced drinking water, built roads with picks and shovels, and acquired turbines so that the town could have electricity.

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