Back

Temples and Convents

Salvatierra

The Pueblo Mágico de Salvatierra belongs to Guanajuato’s Ruta de los Conventos for being one of the main settlements of the Capuchin, Discalced Carmelite and Franciscan orders. Its architecture and history are very valuable, so these are some temples that shouldn’t be missed during the trip through Guanajuato's town.

The Templo y Exconvento del Carmen (Temple and Ex-Convent of Carmen), built between 1644 and 1655 by Discalced Carmelites order, is considered one of Guanajuato's most luxurious religious sites. Its Baroque-Churrigueresque style facade rises over Miguel Hidalgo and Juárez streets, adorned with pink quarry carved, and which interior has naves and domes upholstered with altarpieces.

The 18th century choir and organ were built with noble woods. It can also be seen that part of the land functioned as a cemetery for the religious and city benefactors. Meanwhile, the Sanctuary of Nuestra Señora de la Luz serves as Salvatierra’s patron saint—the Virgen de la Luz, whose image is appreciated inside and was made by Purepecha hands with corn cane pulp.

The temple was restructured after a severe fire in 2002; however, you can still admire its altarpieces covered with gold leaf and 18th and 19th centuries oil paintings. For its part, the Templo y Convento de San Francisco (Temple and Convent of San Francisco) is a construction of the Franciscan friars, who abandoned it for 40 years to rescue it later. Nowadays you can see the religious playing soccer in the orchards while visitors walk on the building’s domes and visit the Father Pérez Museum, which honors the Cristero War martyr.

Finally, the Convent of the Capuchin is one of the three religious constructions in Guanajuato dedicated to female monasticism, that is, the nuns way of life. You can still admire quarry altars with golden applications where the capuchin poor clares pray every day, as the order still is in the convent. Here you can buy wafers, eggnog and churros made by the novices.
The Pueblo Mágico de Salvatierra belongs to Guanajuato’s Ruta de los Conventos for being one of the main settlements of the Capuchin, Discalced Carmelite and Franciscan orders. Its architecture and history are very valuable, so these are some temples that shouldn’t be missed during the trip through Guanajuato's town.

Show more information


The Templo y Exconvento del Carmen (Temple and Ex-Convent of Carmen), built between 1644 and 1655 by Discalced Carmelites order, is considered one of Guanajuato's most luxurious religious sites. Its Baroque-Churrigueresque style facade rises over Miguel Hidalgo and Juárez streets, adorned with pink quarry carved, and which interior has naves and domes upholstered with altarpieces.

The 18th century choir and organ were built with noble woods. It can also be seen that part of the land functioned as a cemetery for the religious and city benefactors. Meanwhile, the Sanctuary of Nuestra Señora de la Luz serves as Salvatierra’s patron saint—the Virgen de la Luz, whose image is appreciated inside and was made by Purepecha hands with corn cane pulp.

The temple was restructured after a severe fire in 2002; however, you can still admire its altarpieces covered with gold leaf and 18th and 19th centuries oil paintings. For its part, the Templo y Convento de San Francisco (Temple and Convent of San Francisco) is a construction of the Franciscan friars, who abandoned it for 40 years to rescue it later. Nowadays you can see the religious playing soccer in the orchards while visitors walk on the building’s domes and visit the Father Pérez Museum, which honors the Cristero War martyr.

Show less

Other activities and things to do
Book now!
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Price range
Category
No hotels matched your search.
Write a key word