Viesca

Recognized as "The origin of La Laguna", Viesca was formerly a sea in pre-Hispanic times, now it is a desert of golden dunes and they became the main attraction of this Magical Town, with great traditions and history.

During prehistory, the region that Viesca occupies today was submerged under water, like most of what is now Mexico. This vastness of water was called the Sea of ​​Tethys. After various events that led to movements and accommodation of the giant tectonic plates, this land emerged, which also had enormous springs, natural salt flats, than an immense desert. During the period of expansion of the great European empires, the Spanish arrived in America.

According to historical files, in 1605 Juan Guerra de la Reza arrived at this place, who was the first miner to exploit the salt flats in Nueva Vizcaya, which in 1605 were called in the native language “de Home”, located in what we know today as Viesca salt flats, Coahuila. In that year, the territory had an enormous reserve of salt, since the salt flats of Chiametla, in the Pacific, produced seven thousand bushels of salt a year and those of Home could produce one hundred thousand bushels in the same period.

At the end of the 16th century, the colonizers, accompanied by Tlaxcala tribes, found a territory rich in springs and inhabited by Chichimec nomads. Organized, from the year 1700, Spaniards and Tlaxcalans born in Nueva Vizcaya, formally requested the Marquis of Aguayo, and later the Governor of the province, for lands to be established officially. After allegations and several unsuccessful attempts at colonization, on July 25, 1731 - the day of Santiago Apóstol, patron saint of Spain, the town that received the name of San José and Santiago del Álamo was founded. In 1830 it was elevated to the category of villa with the name of San José de Viesca and Bustamante to finally stay as Viesca.

Rich in history and traditions, the town preserves buildings such as the Chapel of Santa Ana de Hornos, in the ex-hacienda of the same name, which is said to have been built in 1599 by the Jesuits, who left a broad architectural legacy in which history played a fundamental role in hosting personalities such as Miguel Hidalgo and Benito Juárez.

The motto on the Viesca coat of arms is: “We will always resurface”, in clear reference to his firm character and his determination to continue in his beloved town, despite the vicissitudes of life.

In 2012 it received the name of Pueblo Mágico and since then began a transformation towards the tourist vocation, preserving its history.

In its gastronomy the traditional gorditas stand out, made with flour or corn dough and stuffed with various stews such as roast, beans, slices, potatoes, shredded meat, made by traditional cooks, a group of women, housewives, who have inherited the cultural syncretism, formed in part by his Tlaxcala ancestry, seasoned with European reminiscences and seasoned by local elements and ingredients - they are an example of careful dedication. That is why the relics and the roast, in Viesca, taste better. You can also enjoy a typical "carne asada". The municipality is a great producer of garlic, so this ingredient is present in their recipes and they export it to other towns and cities. .



In the Nayarit Valley there is a gastronomic wealth full of unique flavor and aroma, which satisfies the most demanding palates, Tepic cuisine offers typical dishes of the region with local ingredients such as pozole and shrimp tamales. In this region, the various dishes are adapted to the ingredients that are produced in the state and the region, such is the case of shellfish, spices or chilies to prepare various dishes such as oyster sopes or chimichangas, meatballs and / or shrimp empanadas. to name just a few.

Thanks to the production of shrimp, a great variety of dishes can be prepared such as shrimp broth, delicious breaded shrimp, garlic mojo, devil, in aguachile, coriander and peanut, etc.

The fish is also prepared in many ways in ceviche, breaded, à la diabla, mojo, without missing the star ingredient that is the Huichol sauce that is produced in this city and accompanies all dishes.

The zarandeado fish is the iconic dish of the state, its origin comes from the Island of Mexcaltitán. This Nahuatl delicacy is preferably prepared with the fish called "snapper" which due to its own characteristics (little fat on its skin) means that the meat when exposed to heat. This fish is smoked, on the line of palm rods, previously prepared with a special sauce and served on plates decorated with slices of onion, tomato and cucumber, accompanied by freshly made tortillas, toasts and sauce.

The Ixtlán del Río-style chicken, after cooking, is fried in butter. It is served with cooked and fried potatoes, zucchini in a vinaigrette and chopped lettuce, all this bathed in a tomato sauce with ground oregano.

Pumpkin seed pipian. This delicious stew is prepared with pumpkin seeds, peanuts, roasted grains and ground with the broth of the meat with which it is served. The sauce, unlike other entities where it is also prepared, is left with a light brown color. It is served with tortillas and refried beans.

Among the most typical desserts and sweets we can highlight the agualamas that are fruits the size of a nanchi, but with a black color and intense odor; They are consumed preferably cooked with piloncillo and are typical of the rainy season, the suede, covered bayberry, wind fritters, roasted canes, cocada, coyules, baked corn chub, jericallas, jocuixtles, melado, banana bread, pancle plantain, corn tamales and torrejas.

Tlaxtihuil is another dish of pre-Hispanic origin, which is prepared with corn atole, shrimp powder and chili. Its preparation is very delicate, it really is worthy of congratulation to those who know how to cook it.

Among the traditional drinks there is the piznate, tejuino, tepache, barley water and nanche liquor that are a tradition in this region of the country, but that acquire local identity for their elaboration processes, regional, and their pairing with food.

It is also true that succulent dishes have arrived at Tepic from various parts of Valle Nayarit, such as the fish tatemas of the north coast, the bearded tamales of the municipalities bordering Sinaloa, or the birrias of the municipalities of the southeast, for mention some.

But if we refer to the foods that were waiting on the table for Tepicenses who lived through stages of the second half of the previous century, we must mention the menu of a dining room that closed its doors six years ago, the restaurant "El Nilo" meant the tradition of home cooking whose recipes were inherited from the twenties. For example, the Caldo de Res which is known as 'cocido', a succulent combination of beef and vegetables such as carrots, corn and potatoes. It is still served in the Morelos and Abasolo markets.

In the Nayarit Valley there is a gastronomic wealth full of unique flavor and aroma, which satisfies the most demanding palates, Tepic cuisine offers typical dishes of the region with local ingredients such as pozole and shrimp tamales. In this region, the various dishes are adapted to the ingredients that are produced in the state and the region, such is the case of shellfish, spices or chilies to prepare various dishes such as oyster sopes or chimichangas, meatballs and / or shrimp empanadas. to name just a few.

Thanks to the production of shrimp, a great variety of dishes can be prepared such as shrimp broth, delicious breaded shrimp, garlic mojo, devil, in aguachile, coriander and peanut, etc.

The fish is also prepared in many ways in ceviche, breaded, à la diabla, mojo, without missing the star ingredient that is the Huichol sauce that is produced in this city and accompanies all dishes.

The zarandeado fish is the iconic dish of the state, its origin comes from the Island of Mexcaltitán. This Nahuatl delicacy is preferably prepared with the fish called "snapper" which due to its own characteristics (little fat on its skin) means that the meat when exposed to heat. This fish is smoked, on the line of palm rods, previously prepared with a special sauce and served on plates decorated with slices of onion, tomato and cucumber, accompanied by freshly made tortillas, toasts and sauce.

The Ixtlán del Río-style chicken, after cooking, is fried in butter. It is served with cooked and fried potatoes, zucchini in a vinaigrette and chopped lettuce, all this bathed in a tomato sauce with ground oregano.

Pumpkin seed pipian. This delicious stew is prepared with pumpkin seeds, peanuts, roasted grains and ground with the broth of the meat with which it is served. The sauce, unlike other entities where it is also prepared, is left with a light brown color. It is served with tortillas and refried beans.

Among the most typical desserts and sweets we can highlight the agualamas that are fruits the size of a nanchi, but with a black color and intense odor; They are consumed preferably cooked with piloncillo and are typical of the rainy season, the suede, covered bayberry, wind fritters, roasted canes, cocada, coyules, baked corn chub, jericallas, jocuixtles, melado, banana bread, pancle plantain, corn tamales and torrejas.

Tlaxtihuil is another dish of pre-Hispanic origin, which is prepared with corn atole, shrimp powder and chili. Its preparation is very delicate, it really is worthy of congratulation to those who know how to cook it.

Among the traditional drinks there is the piznate, tejuino, tepache, barley water and nanche liquor that are a tradition in this region of the country, but that acquire local identity for their elaboration processes, regional, and their pairing with food.

It is also true that succulent dishes have arrived at Tepic from various parts of Valle Nayarit, such as the fish tatemas of the north coast, the bearded tamales of the municipalities bordering Sinaloa, or the birrias of the municipalities of the southeast, for mention some.

But if we refer to the foods that were waiting on the table for Tepicenses who lived through stages of the second half of the previous century, we must mention the menu of a dining room that closed its doors six years ago, the restaurant "El Nilo" meant the tradition of home cooking whose recipes were inherited from the twenties. For example, the Caldo de Res which is known as 'cocido', a succulent combination of beef and vegetables such as carrots, corn and potatoes. It is still served in the Morelos and Abasolo markets.



The Menudo of 'fat broth' was another unmissable food, when it was not yet considered a punishment to the heart as in our days. The broth was tasted with onion, peppermint, oregano and green chili.

Tepicenses also remember those tostadas that people knew as “Tostadas del Slippery”, whose style of origin could have been in the dining rooms of the Jauja and Bellavista factories. A fat of corn dough, about 12 centimeters in diameter, was browned in butter, until the omelette was very golden brown. Without further ado, pieces of pork meat loin or leg were placed on top, previously fried in butter and chanfaina. The food did not have any other garnish than salt, lemon and the Huichol sauce that would later be marketed worldwide.

The so-called “basket tacos”, also called sweaty or strolled, were perhaps also a solution for the factory workers, since they did not stain their hands with sauces. Let's consider that they handled blankets, cottons and blankets.

The morisqueta was an everyday dish. White rice was added to the beans in the pot. Sometimes there was no more, but that was enough.



The Menudo of 'fat broth' was another unmissable food, when it was not yet considered a punishment to the heart as in our days. The broth was tasted with onion, peppermint, oregano and green chili.

Tepicenses also remember those tostadas that people knew as “Tostadas del Slippery”, whose style of origin could have been in the dining rooms of the Jauja and Bellavista factories. A fat of corn dough, about 12 centimeters in diameter, was browned in butter, until the omelette was very golden brown. Without further ado, pieces of pork meat loin or leg were placed on top, previously fried in butter and chanfaina. The food did not have any other garnish than salt, lemon and the Huichol sauce that would later be marketed worldwide.

The so-called “basket tacos”, also called sweaty or strolled, were perhaps also a solution for the factory workers, since they did not stain their hands with sauces. Let's consider that they handled blankets, cottons and blankets.

The morisqueta was an everyday dish. White rice was added to the beans in the pot. Sometimes there was no more, but that was enough.

Regarding pastry and the delicious art of preparing sweets, Viesca is champion. The mamones or delicious breads prepared with piloncillo are their identity. Made with wholemeal flour and with a porous consistency and its characteristic pink color makes them irresistible, unmistakable. The local gastronomy also includes the production of crystallized fruit and cacti; from dates to biznagas. All succulent, all locally produced. The milk and nut candies are of the highest quality. With reservation, local tour guides can take you to one of the family businesses where, in the traditional way, you can try these delicacies.