Day of the Dead


The Day of the Dead is one of the most representative celebrations in Mexico and is a sample of the syncretism that arises from pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs.

For pre-Columbian cultures, the cult of death was a core part of their worldview, with the arrival of the Spanish and evangelization; this tradition became what we now know as the celebration of the Day of the Dead.

This tradition is based on the indigenous belief that the souls of the deceased return one night a year to the world of the living to spend time with their loved ones, who receive them with altars,“cempasuchil”(also known as marigold) flowers, incense, music, as well as their favorite drinks and foods.

In accordance with Catholic tradition, children are remembered on November 1, called All Saints’ Day, and adults on November 2, called All Souls’ Day.

The Day of the Dead is celebrated throughout the Republic, but each state and region has its own traditions, from the center of the country with its beautiful altars and the “Alumbrada”, the “Huasteca” region with its “Xantolo” festival, to the southeast with the “Hanal Pixán”. Without a doubt, it is one of the traditions that best represent our cultural wealth and that we are proud to share with the world.

It is the way in which since ancient times we honor our dead, we perceive life and we understand death because on this day there is no sadness, only the happiness of being able to share with our lost ones once more.

The importance of this festival is such that in 2008 UNESCO appointed it as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

We invite you to live a unique experience in the world and to discover the way in which in the different destinations of Mexico life beyond death is celebrated.
The Day of the Dead is one of the most representative celebrations in Mexico and is a sample of the syncretism that arises from pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs.

Show more information



For pre-Columbian cultures, the cult of death was a core part of their worldview, with the arrival of the Spanish and evangelization; this tradition became what we now know as the celebration of the Day of the Dead.

This tradition is based on the indigenous belief that the souls of the deceased return one night a year to the world of the living to spend time with their loved ones, who receive them with altars,“cempasuchil”(also known as marigold) flowers, incense, music, as well as their favorite drinks and foods.

In accordance with Catholic tradition, children are remembered on November 1, called All Saints’ Day, and adults on November 2, called All Souls’ Day.

The Day of the Dead is celebrated throughout the Republic, but each state and region has its own traditions, from the center of the country with its beautiful altars and the “Alumbrada”, the “Huasteca” region with its “Xantolo” festival, to the southeast with the “Hanal Pixán”. Without a doubt, it is one of the traditions that best represent our cultural wealth and that we are proud to share with the world.

It is the way in which since ancient times we honor our dead, we perceive life and we understand death because on this day there is no sadness, only the happiness of being able to share with our lost ones once more.

The importance of this festival is such that in 2008 UNESCO appointed it as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

We invite you to live a unique experience in the world and to discover the way in which in the different destinations of Mexico life beyond death is celebrated.

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Discover the best destinations to experience the Day of the Dead
Discover the best destinations to experience the Day of the Dead
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