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Historic Revolution Museum

Chihuahua

Also known as “Quinta Luz” in honor of the widow of the Centauro del Norte (Francisco Villa), this property had a variety of different uses before becoming a museum. It was first used as a slaughterhouse and later rented by Villa as a residence with use of the stables. After a series of personal adaptations, the colonel decided to purchase the property.

The museum's collection is centered around a number of objects: letters, official documents, personal items and kitchen utensils, furniture, weaponry and photographs. Three pieces stand out in particular, which show the revolutionary hero dressed up to the nines in formal attire, putting aside his cartridge belt and unmistakable sombrero for an instant. Other images that might catch you eye depict a number of his women, as well as some of the sixty children he fathered.

The residence is huge, so we recommend taking the time to explore it properly. There are two floors, two patios and a basement, from which some people insist that there is a tunnel leading to the Cathedral-we’ll leave it up to you to find out. Moving on through the collection, you will come across an object which is impossible to miss: the car in which the military leader was shot in Parral, Chihuahua. Some of the more than 100 shots fired at the vehicle before Villa passed away can still be seen on the bodywork.

According to historical archives, Doroteo Arango - Villa's real name - was legally married at least twenty-five times, however, the woman he always introduced as his wife was Doña Luz Corral, who shared this very house with him until he died, and who, following his death, mounted an exhibition of objects belonging to her late husband. Years later, she decided to donate the property to the Ministry of Defence, on the condition that it were to remain a museum.

Also known as “Quinta Luz” in honor of the widow of the Centauro del Norte (Francisco Villa), this property had a variety of different uses before becoming a museum. It was first used as a slaughterhouse and later rented by Villa as a residence with use of the stables. After a series of personal adaptations, the colonel decided to purchase the property.

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The museum's collection is centered around a number of objects: letters, official documents, personal items and kitchen utensils, furniture, weaponry and photographs. Three pieces stand out in particular, which show the revolutionary hero dressed up to the nines in formal attire, putting aside his cartridge belt and unmistakable sombrero for an instant. Other images that might catch you eye depict a number of his women, as well as some of the sixty children he fathered.

The residence is huge, so we recommend taking the time to explore it properly. There are two floors, two patios and a basement, from which some people insist that there is a tunnel leading to the Cathedral-we’ll leave it up to you to find out. Moving on through the collection, you will come across an object which is impossible to miss: the car in which the military leader was shot in Parral, Chihuahua. Some of the more than 100 shots fired at the vehicle before Villa passed away can still be seen on the bodywork.

According to historical archives, Doroteo Arango - Villa's real name - was legally married at least twenty-five times, however, the woman he always introduced as his wife was Doña Luz Corral, who shared this very house with him until he died, and who, following his death, mounted an exhibition of objects belonging to her late husband. Years later, she decided to donate the property to the Ministry of Defence, on the condition that it were to remain a museum.

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