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Vintage Buildings

Batopilas

In Batopilas there are places that create the sensation of being in a ghost town, like la Misión de Satevó (“The Mission of Satevó”), located eight kilometers (“5 miles”) from the downtown area, following the river's shore. It was called the “catedral perdida” (lost cathedral), for being isolated from the population. It was built by the Jesuit missionary Manuel Ordaz and the Rarámuris natives in 1699. Since then, its walls have remained intact and with devotion to the Virgin of Los Dolores.

Returning to the center of the Pueblo Mágico (“Magical Town”) of Batopilas, there is another survivor of the Jesuit order, the Virgen del Carmen church. It has the characteristic of having a “belfry”, a single wall bell tower that only has the holes to place the bells. A few steps away, you can also visit the Barffuson and Bligger houses, which belonged to the commissioners of the royal house of Spain and the wealthiest miners, from when Batopilas lived the splendour of silver mining.

The old Casa de Raya is also preserved, next to the aqueduct that was built for hydroelectric purposes. In fact, Batopilas was the second city in Mexico to have electricity. Finally, there is the Casa Cural, which was a renowned 18th century grocery store.

In Batopilas there are places that create the sensation of being in a ghost town, like la Misión de Satevó (“The Mission of Satevó”), located eight kilometers (“5 miles”) from the downtown area, following the river's shore. It was called the “catedral perdida” (lost cathedral), for being isolated from the population. It was built by the Jesuit missionary Manuel Ordaz and the Rarámuris natives in 1699. Since then, its walls have remained intact and with devotion to the Virgin of Los Dolores.

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Returning to the center of the Pueblo Mágico (“Magical Town”) of Batopilas, there is another survivor of the Jesuit order, the Virgen del Carmen church. It has the characteristic of having a “belfry”, a single wall bell tower that only has the holes to place the bells. A few steps away, you can also visit the Barffuson and Bligger houses, which belonged to the commissioners of the royal house of Spain and the wealthiest miners, from when Batopilas lived the splendour of silver mining.

The old Casa de Raya is also preserved, next to the aqueduct that was built for hydroelectric purposes. In fact, Batopilas was the second city in Mexico to have electricity. Finally, there is the Casa Cural, which was a renowned 18th century grocery store.

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