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Loreto is an oasis trapped between the waters of Mar de Cortés and the desert lands of Sierra Giganta. It’s the remote land that the Jesuits used to start their pilgrimage to evangelize and colonize Baja and Alta California. But it’s also a Pueblo Mágico (Magical Town) of Baja California Sur that has the joy of being gray and blue whales (the largest in the world) temporary home; of being in front of a set of islands declared a World Heritage Site; and of being one of Mexico’s favorite sun and beach destinations.

Although it seems to be away from everything, there is much to do in Loreto: the Main Square is simple, but with a colonial charm that encourages you to get lost in its cobbled walkways that trace the path to the baroque facade of the Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Loreto, the Museo de las Misiones (Museum of the Missions) and the handicraft shops, restaurants and coffee shops.

The boardwalk is beyond, a long barrier that the inhabitants adapt as a “sofa” to watch sunsets. But, it’s also the gateway to two of the closest to town quiet-atmosphere beaches—Centro and Oasis. If you want to go to other solitary beaches with turquoise waters, the marina is there, from where the boats depart to reach the Parque Nacional Bahía de Loreto (Bahía de Loreto National Park), made up of a dozen islands and islets that allow you to swim with sea lions, do birdwatching, row a kayak, snorkel or scuba diving.

Downtown Loreto is also characterized by its boutique hotels, such as Santa Fe, Hotel 1697, and Loreto Playa. However, along the coast, luxurious All-Inclusive properties and golf courses have been built, which look towards the islands and allow you to get closer to other must-see beaches, such as Nopoló, Ensenada Blanca, Agua Verde and San Bruno, protected by cliffs. Among its most exclusive services are excursions to contemplate cave paintings in Sierra Giganta, taste “chocolata” clams, navigate the Sea of Cortés and passive whale watching at Isla El Carmen.

How to get there: Loreto is 365 kilometers (226 miles) from La Paz and communicates with the main cities of Baja California Sur and Baja California by the Trans peninsular highway. However, it’s also accessible by a 30-minute plane flight from the capital of Baja California Sur.
Loreto is an oasis trapped between the waters of Mar de Cortés and the desert lands of Sierra Giganta. It’s the remote land that the Jesuits used to start their pilgrimage to evangelize and colonize Baja and Alta California. But it’s also a Pueblo Mágico (Magical Town) of Baja California Sur that has the joy of being gray and blue whales (the largest in the world) temporary home; of being in front of a set of islands declared a World Heritage Site; and of being one of Mexico’s favorite sun and beach destinations.

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Although it seems to be away from everything, there is much to do in Loreto: the Main Square is simple, but with a colonial charm that encourages you to get lost in its cobbled walkways that trace the path to the baroque facade of the Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Loreto, the Museo de las Misiones (Museum of the Missions) and the handicraft shops, restaurants and coffee shops.

The boardwalk is beyond, a long barrier that the inhabitants adapt as a “sofa” to watch sunsets. But, it’s also the gateway to two of the closest to town quiet-atmosphere beaches—Centro and Oasis. If you want to go to other solitary beaches with turquoise waters, the marina is there, from where the boats depart to reach the Parque Nacional Bahía de Loreto (Bahía de Loreto National Park), made up of a dozen islands and islets that allow you to swim with sea lions, do birdwatching, row a kayak, snorkel or scuba diving.

Downtown Loreto is also characterized by its boutique hotels, such as Santa Fe, Hotel 1697, and Loreto Playa. However, along the coast, luxurious All-Inclusive properties and golf courses have been built, which look towards the islands and allow you to get closer to other must-see beaches, such as Nopoló, Ensenada Blanca, Agua Verde and San Bruno, protected by cliffs. Among its most exclusive services are excursions to contemplate cave paintings in Sierra Giganta, taste “chocolata” clams, navigate the Sea of Cortés and passive whale watching at Isla El Carmen.

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